Eu quero que você sinta como se estivesse em um sonho~
(português não é a minha primeira língua, por favor me perdoe)

tifanmkreyol:

Shedding Light on Voodoo Rituals in Haiti

“The Vodou faith teaches us to bless nature and support cosmic harmony for the purposes of mastering divine magnetism,” he said. “Vodou accepts the existence of the visible and the invisible, in a sense that it is believed that one does not see all that exists, and Vodou is in full compliance with the laws of nature.”

That Voodoo is mostly about black magic or conjuring evil forces is only one of many misconceptions about the religion. While a Bokors, which could be described as a sorcerer of sorts, do exist, Karen said the darker aspects of Voodoo are not common practice. “It’s extremely rare and often looked down upon by many Vodouisants themselves,” he said.

Vodou says, there’s God, sure, Gran Met, but He’s big, too big and too far away to worry Himself if your ass is poor, or you can’t get laid.

—Count Zero, William Gibson (via judgeamanbyhisfavoritebooks)

stephaniekeith:

Gede ceremony Nov 23

A good time was had by all at one of the last Gede parties of the November season. A small apartment in East Flatbush, Brooklyn was rocking until 7 in the morning. The end of the party saw an amazing number of Gedes appear. There must have been 10 people possessed by a Gede. Normally, Tipis Gede comes to these parties, but on this night I met a new one called Gede Reserve.

africa-will-unite:

Tell me about it…

africa-will-unite:

Tell me about it…

diasporadash:

Stills from ‘One Day in Port-au-Prince’ | The Voodoo Priest 

(Source: diasporadash)

upfromsumdirt:

my friend at UK, Dr. Adam Banks, is hosting an highly academic forum in Chicago next spring that will focus on afrofuturism and its roll in digital communication (and vice-a-versa, i’d imagine) … he asked me to come up with a few concepts to run as promotional material for the event; this is my favorite so far, but sadly, it’s one he’s rejected so far in favor of a work still in progress. - he did say he might want to use this one for one of his own personal projects / if i dont beat him to it! 
those well-versed in the history of American barbarism will recognize the artistic license taken with the image above, replacing the vicious scarification with vévé of Eshu Elegbara as constellation. it also owes a nod to the works of Bearden and Matisse. in future revisions, i think i’ll stylize his entire silhouette as a constellation and have it entirely white on black. 

upfromsumdirt:

my friend at UK, Dr. Adam Banks, is hosting an highly academic forum in Chicago next spring that will focus on afrofuturism and its roll in digital communication (and vice-a-versa, i’d imagine) … he asked me to come up with a few concepts to run as promotional material for the event; this is my favorite so far, but sadly, it’s one he’s rejected so far in favor of a work still in progress. - he did say he might want to use this one for one of his own personal projects / if i dont beat him to it! 

those well-versed in the history of American barbarism will recognize the artistic license taken with the image above, replacing the vicious scarification with vévé of Eshu Elegbara as constellation. it also owes a nod to the works of Bearden and Matisse. in future revisions, i think i’ll stylize his entire silhouette as a constellation and have it entirely white on black. 

odofemi:

dreaminginspanish:

True Voodoo Meet Mama Lola.mov (by BlankPaigeTV)

This is my Lukumi Godmother’s Godmother in Vodou, Mama Lola! <3

(I guess that means that we’re kind of related?)

soul-service:
Yemaya has many other names. Known as the Star of The Sea in Brazil,
Iemanjá.
In Macumba, she is known as Ocean Goddess of the Crescent Moon.
Oh okay. Because Macumba is a religion. Iemanjá is still Iemanjá in Umbanda.
In Haiti, she is Agwe. New Orleans women worship her as La Balianne.
Nope. No, no, no. Agwe is a male lwa of the sea in Vodou. The other lwa mentioned is spelled La Baleine. She is not Iemanjá, either. They are related to the sea and they share certain aspects. They are not the same spirit.
And, in Cuba she has three names
I think that this person is writing about caminos. I&#8217;m not Lucumi but I&#8217;m pretty sure that there are more than three paths of Yemaya in Lucumi.
Not only do you have your facts wrong, but based on the rest of your &#8220;article&#8221; you could learn where to put an apostrophe.
Can&#8217;t we all just do our research? It is really not that difficult

soul-service:

Yemaya has many other names. Known as the Star of The Sea in Brazil,

Iemanjá.

In Macumba, she is known as Ocean Goddess of the Crescent Moon.

Oh okay. Because Macumba is a religion. Iemanjá is still Iemanjá in Umbanda.

In Haiti, she is Agwe. New Orleans women worship her as La Balianne.

Nope. No, no, no. Agwe is a male lwa of the sea in Vodou. The other lwa mentioned is spelled La Baleine. She is not Iemanjá, either. They are related to the sea and they share certain aspects. They are not the same spirit.

And, in Cuba she has three names

I think that this person is writing about caminos. I’m not Lucumi but I’m pretty sure that there are more than three paths of Yemaya in Lucumi.

Not only do you have your facts wrong, but based on the rest of your “article” you could learn where to put an apostrophe.

Can’t we all just do our research? It is really not that difficult

afrodiaspores:

withrevolutionarycries:

deluxvivens:

wakeupblackpower:

“Chicken bones. Conferring with spirits and ethereal deities. Visions of graveyard rituals. These are the images movies and superstition have conjured about the practitioners of the religion of voodoo, or Vodoun.

Unlike Judeo-Christian religions, Vodoun encompasses all areas in a person’s life and incorporates intricate rituals for even the smallest daily routine. The religion stems from natural religions cultivated and handed down from generation to generation in Africa. Largely based on general concepts such as “nature” or the “spirit,” Vodoun is the predecessor to American voodoo. The name “voodoo” is actually a term created by those who saw the religion as evil, but it has derived from several sources, including “Vodou” in the Fon language and “Vudu” in the Ewe language. All told, more than 30 tribal groups in West Africa subscribed to the religion.

OK i’m not feeling this article at all. Starts off about voudun but then talks about “ase”; yoruba based religion and fon based religion are *not* interchangeable. And also I know its not hip in some circles to talk about Islam in Africa but plenty of enslaved Africans were muslims and stayed that way the best they could. I suggest people read Servants of Allah: African Muslims Enslaved in the Americas.

reblogged for the critique

While I appreciate the thrust of the original piece and am grateful for the conversation it has opened up, I would want to build on the critiques concerning Islam and Yorùbá traditional religion thus far by noting that Central African groups were among the first to arrive in the Americas as slaves. Culturally and linguistically Bantu-inspired traditions not only contributed to the development of Vodou in Haiti and hoodoo in the United States, but also inform ‘Kongo’ traditions in the Caribbean and Latin America, such as Afro-Cuban Palo Monte. To add another layer of complexity to the situation, some of those enslaved persons from the Kingdom of Kongo had already converted to Roman Catholicism by the end of the fifteenth century as the result of Portuguese missionization, so Christian aspects of Afro-Diasporic traditions (the use of crosses in Espiritismo, chromolithographs of saints in Lucumí, and so forth) are not always an imposition from above or matter of dissimulation. Of course, this remains a challenge to the popular historiography on these issues, yet the scholarly consensus has been turning towards this view with the recent publication of several new monographs, especially about Central Africans in the “New World.” 

But the Yoruba and Dahomey kingdoms were geographically close to one another, which is why Vodou and Yoruba religions share paradigms of spirits, like Ogun. The falsehood that stands out to me in this article isn’t about the concept of ase, it’s the statement that vodou has influenced African-American hoodoo, which is Congo-influenced, not Yoruba or Fon.

And although Islam was a very strong religion among slaves brought to the Americas, I would hesitate to call it “the first African-American religion” simply for the fact that Islam is not African in origin but I see your point there

(Source: awakenenlighten)

oh darlings

going through the ‘orisha’ tag on tumblr and…psa…

no shade intended but people of ALL shades get called to ATRs. japanese people, middle easterners, and yes, white people, all people. i see dominicans, filipinos, mexicans, persians, chinese people, anglo-saxon whites in the service of the orixa and the lwa.

and honestly? it is not for us, humans on this earth, to judge what person gets called by orixa or lwa to serve them. it is not to us to say god, why do you want this white person as your priest or your priestess? because god, orixa, their lwa, has chosen them for a reason. they pick who they want. am i gonna argue with ezili danto, or oxala? no, ma’am. and it is not for anyone else to pass judgement on, either. if someone gets called to serve, and they answer that call, well! that is their path to walk in life, and i’m not getting in exu’s way over the color of someone’s skin.

Dear Tumblr

Let me break things down for you:

Yemaya is not Agwe. They do not ‘call Yemaya Agwe in Haiti’. Yemaya and Agwe are two different spirits. They are revered in different ways. The closest Vodou equivalent to Yemaya is La Sirene - however, they are not the same. They share similar characteristics, they share archetypes if you will, and while their origins go back to Africa, you are doing people who don’t know any better a disservice by claiming that Yemaya is Agwe or vice versa. Vodou and Yoruba traditions have similarities, even very similar spirits - such as Nana Buruku and Ogum - and there are some common origins. But Exu is not Papa Legba, Oxum is not Ezili Freda. It’s very easy to fall back on this common archetypes when explaining the context of a spirit - Yemaya and Agwe have the ocean in common, Exu and Legba like red and black and open doorways for us, but they are similar, not the same.

govi for Ezili Freda

govi for Ezili Freda